autism

Why do normal people question vaccines?

Children ask questions about everything under the sun. Reporters ask questions to get their story. Scientists ask questions to understand a matter. I am a normal person who is  kicking off this post with a couple of questions. Why is there a taboo around questioning vaccines? Why can’t normal people question them without being labeled “wackos” or “anti-vaxxers?” I suggest that all of us should feel free to question vaccines, and here’s why.

  • If we care about the food we ingest, we should care about everything we put into our bodies.
  • If we want to know the list of ingredients in the food we are eating, we should want to know what ingredients are in a vaccination.
  • If we are skeptical of conventional health care, we should question the motives of pharmaceutical companies that are lobbying for mandatory vaccinations for children and adults, nationwide.
  • If we believe in food freedom (that we should be allowed to eat what we want to eat), we should also embrace health freedom (that we have the right to accept or reject any medical procedure).

As a young mom, I remember wondering if I should follow the vaccine schedule for my children. I had no logical reason to question vaccinations at all, really, because I didn’t know much about vaccine side effects or ingredients or anything. There was just a little question in the back of my mind, a kind of check in my gut about them. I suppose I was hesitant about them because of the fact that I had always been a girl with a natural bent. I figured my body could handle itself, without too much interference. I preferred to let a fever run its course. I would avoid over-the-counter remedies for a mild cold or aches and pains. I chose completely natural childbirth for each of my babies (no pain-killing drugs, no medical interventions).

So while I wasn’t super informed about vaccinations, I wondered about the benefit/risk ratio. But I didn’t wonder for long. I went ahead and had my children all vaccinated on time because I knew that in Washington DC, in order to attend public school, they had to have all of the vaccinations, according to the CDC schedule.

I didn’t think much more about it for some time. My inclination to keep things natural, health-wise, eventually led me to become a member, and then a chapter leader for the Weston A. Price Foundation (WAPF). I liked their natural bent! They espouse Hippocrates' motto "Let food be thy medicine and let medicine be thy food."

However, when I came across something in the WAPF literature about vaccinations, I scratched my head about it, because I thought that WAPF was a nutrition group, focused on food, farming, and the healing arts. A stance on vaccinations (and an individual’s right to reject them) seemed an unnecessarily polarizing position to take. Why would WAPF go out on a limb when they could safely advocate for wholesome food and sustainable farming practices, without rocking the status quo?

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Over time, the answer started to dawn on me. WAPF is a group that’s willing to ask questions about conventional health protocol. Of course their willingness to ask about food sources, food quality, and the like would translate to other things we put into our bodies. It struck me that it is normal, and even healthy, to ask questions to safeguard my health and the health of my family. So I began to dig around and ask a few questions, myself.

  • Why are premature babies given the same dose of vaccines as full-term babies? (Shouldn’t the dosage be adjusted for weight?)
  • What ingredients are in the vaccines and are any toxic or apt to cause adverse reactions?
  • Why do babies get a hepB vaccine the day they are born (when it is a vaccine intended to prevent a disease that is sexually communicated)?
  • Is there room for a conversation about spacing out the heavy vaccination schedule that requires up to 24 doses before a child reaches 5 years of age?
  • Why is it so difficult to get a medical or religious exemption in most states?
  • Why are children denied a public education when unvaccinated, if education is a constitutional right?
  • If vaccines are safe and effective, why was the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act established in 1986, setting up a vaccine injury compensation program (that to date has doled out over 3..8 billion dollars to families of vaccine-injured children and adults)?
  • Why has the CDC not done a controlled study, comparing the health of vaccinated and unvaccinated children?
  • Why was the CDC accused of covering up study results that indicated a link between vaccinations and autism among African-American boys?
  • If vaccines do not cause autism, as the CDC claims, where are the studies that disprove the link?
  • And a related question: if vaccines don’t cause autism, why do so many parents of autistic children insist that they do?
  • What does the evidence around us suggest?
  • What links are there between vaccinations and other injuries and illnesses?
  • Why are vaccines pushed at every turn (in grocery stores, corner drug stores, etc.)? And who stands to gain from this push?

Do you have questions of your own? Great! That means you're normal. Keep digging until you find answers that satisfy your curiosity. And check out these podcast episodes to learn something beyond what the mainstream media reports:

#16 Vaccines: what’s all the fuss about? (part 1) -  w/ producer Leslie Manookian of “The Greater Good”

#17 Vaccines: what's all the fuss about? (part 2) 

#54 Vaxxed: Producer's commentary - w/ Del Bigtree of “Vaxxed,” the movie that focuses on the CDC whistleblower

#64 The vaccine industry & your rights - w/ attorney Alan Phillips

#72 Fighting for health freedom – a group of people in West Virginia are fighting for the right to vaccine exemptions

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*** Hilda Labrada Gore is the producer and host of the Wise Traditions podcast found on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play Music, iHeart Radio, tunein, YouTube and at westonaprice.org. She lives in DC with her husband and children, their cat, Mia, and their dog, Summer.

If your mainstream doctor doesn't have answers...

look elsewhere. These were the simple, gentle words uttered by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride during an interview on the Wise Traditions podcast.

“If your mainstream doctor doesn’t have answers, look elsewhere.”

She reiterated that we should be polite, say “thank you very much” and then walk out the door. Once there, the work begins. It’s time to buckle down and begin investigating on our own.

This advice is something that Natasha has lived out. She is now known as the brilliant author of “Gut and Psychology Syndrome”—a book that has helped millions. But what got her there was a tragic turning point. She was thrown for a loop when her son was diagnosed with autism around the age of three. She was a neurologist but she knew nothing about what could possibly be the root of his condition. What she did know is that she could not/would not accept that diagnosis as the final word.

She began digging around and found that there was a connection between gut health and how the brain functions. Years earlier, she had noticed that many of her neurology patients had gastro-intestinal issues as well, but she would simply refer them to the GI specialist. Now she was beginning to see how these issues were interrelated. Her investigations led her to the Specific Carbohydrate Diet created by Dr. Sidney Valentine Haas. From that diet, she derived the GAPS (Gut and Psychology Syndrome) diet which helped her son recover completely and put her on the path to help countless others with chronic conditions, including epilepsy, ADHD, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, dyslexia, dyspraxia, depression, and schizophrenia.

Natasha’s story ended up in the “Best of 2016” episode of the Wise Traditions podcast, where it is paired with the story of holistic doctor Dr. Tom Cowan and dairy farmer Charlotte Smith. Each of them, in their own way, basically gives the same message that Natasha gives: “If your mainstream doctor doesn’t have answers, look elsewhere.”

As a young man, Dr. Tom Cowan was not satisfied with the simplistic answers he heard doctors giving their patients. He recounts witnessing the following encounter. A doctor told his patient that the poor air quality in Detroit was the cause of her persistent cough. She then asked him, “Then why aren’t you coughing, doc?” Tom laughed (and was not allowed to stick around after that).

He came to the realization that most doctors were treating symptoms but not the root cause of many conditions. Even holistic doctors have this tendency, he readily admits. This is why he recommends taking your health into your own hands

Charlotte Smith’s children struggled with intense eczema. The itchy red rash was even on her daughter’s eyelids! The backs of her son’s hands were constantly scabby and red. She tried everything under the sun that doctors, fellow moms, and friends said might work. When she got to raw milk, her expectations were low, but after having her family drink some daily for just two weeks, her son showed her the back of his hands and they were perfectly smooth. He recovered completely in a matter of two months! (Her daughter, whose case was more serious, recovered in about six months.)

Food could be medicine, Charlotte realized! It was a HUGE a-ha moment. She would not have stumbled upon it had she not persevered in finding something beyond conventional treatment (steroids) to bring her children relief. Now her whole family is enjoying the benefits of raw milk. They haven’t been sick for years! Charlotte's own seasonal allergies have cleared up. Antibiotics for infections are a thing of the past. And now Charlotte even runs a micro dairy, Champoeg Creamery, in Oregon!

These three distinct stories have one cohesive message. Do not passively accept what anyone tells you. When it comes to your health, be skeptical, like “doubting Thomas” (as Dr. Cowan dubs himself). Dig deeper. Ask questions. Educate yourself. Listen to the episode here that highlights these three individuals who did just that. And then continue on your journey to improved health.

***

Hilda Labrada Gore is a health coach and fitness professional. She is the DC chapter leader for the Weston A. Price Foundation and is the Wise Traditions podcast host. Wise Traditions can be found on YouTube, iTunes, Stitcher, iHeartRadio, Google Play Music and at westonaprice.org.

 

 

The power of a Mama Bear

"Never underestimate the power of a Mama Bear defending her cub." Joel Salatin said something to this effect when I interviewed him recently. He was talking about the strength and determination of a mother looking out for her child. I know moms like this. Two days ago, I spoke with a mom friend of mine who was calling out her teen for lying. That took guts: a willingness to confront her child, impose repercussions and then deal with the fallout. Today I was on the phone with a mom whose elementary-aged daughter was home with a tummy ache. This took patience: she had spent the morning tending to her and the afternoon (and the days ahead) will probably hold more of the same.

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When I was a kid, my own mom worked several jobs at one time to make ends meet for our family.

I love these women. They, and countless others, are true Mama Bears. They are willing to do whatever it takes to provide and protect their little ones. They are fierce, passionate, seeking out whatever is needed for their children need to grow to be strong and healthy.

Tressie Taylor is just this kind of mom. Her son, Omar, was diagnosed as on the autistic spectrum when he was around two years old. Tressie wasn't satisfied with the end goal of the recommended behavioral therapy so she went into "bear mode." She sought out options, determined to find something better for Omar. She discovered a two-pronged approach to healing for her son: a nutrient-dense Wise Traditions diet and a chelation protocol established by Dr. Andy Cutler. (Chelation escorts metals out of the body, and Dr. Cutler's protocol is the safest method out there.)

Today, Omar has lost his diagnosis. And Tressie is a Mama Bear for hundreds of children (not just her own). To hear more of her amazing story, click here.

I'm inspired by women who fight fiercely for what they believe in. Do you know any Mama Bears? How are you exercising your own Mama Bear power?