Health secrets from a centenarian

Three years ago, on my birthday in mid-August, I found myself in a remote Maasai village, about three hours from Nairobi. There was no need for cake or ice cream or balloons. I received the most FANTASTIC present, first thing. I was given the opportunity to sit at the feet of a 100+ year old man and hear about his life. Dickson, my Maasai host, introduced me to Sankau Ole Sirote. He seemed weathered, but well. Sankau gave me permission to interview him, recording our exchange on my phone. I could hardly wait! What had his eyes seen, over the course of those many decades? And what secrets might I learn (and pass on to my readers and friends) about how to live a healthy, long life?

 Sankau, resting, outside his friend's home

Sankau, resting, outside his friend's home

I was also eager to see for myself if the Weston A. Price Foundation (WAPF) principles would hold water. Did a diet of traditional, unprocessed foods sustain this man to 100 years of age and beyond?

Here are some excerpts from our conversation:

  • what he did as a child and youth

“When I was young, there was no school by that time. So my life was just to go and handle the cattle. That was my daily activity. Getting the cows, and going hunting."

  • on hunting

“When we were morans [young warriors in training], we would really hunt lion, and rhino, elephant, buffalos. We would hunt for fun, not really to eat the meat of the lion or the elephant or the rhino. We would just hunt for fun.

One time we also went hunting, and...[a] companion of mine was attacked by a lion and killed. So I...came back to help the family, to raise the children of my departed friend."

Rhino mama and her baby
Rhino mama and her baby
  • what he would eat as a child

“When we were children...our diets were milk, fat, meat, and also sometimes honey. There was a lot of rain. Wild fruits were available and the milk was plenty. And the cows also were healthy. So everything, when we were young, everything was just healthy."

  • regarding his health today

"I'm getting old because of my eyes and in the morning sometimes I have joint aches. It's just age."

  • regarding his health across the years

No surgeries? "No." No medicine? "No." Any shots? "Recently, because of this hand. It is swelling, so I got an injection. Because of the swelling."

  • regarding the community's health in the past

“There was no one who was sick. We were all very healthy.”

  • regarding the community's health today

“There are so many changes. People are getting sick. There are diseases which…there are many, many diseases, which I cannot even describe. There are a lot of diseases coming, but before, as I said, there were no diseases.

During my days, there were no injections but right now every time, they just say the people need to be vaccinated because a disease is coming, people need to be injected. But when I was a young man I never had an injection.”

  • what people are eating today

“Even food they have changed. Because you have to buy food. Everything you have to buy from the shop so… And during my time you would depend on what is coming from the livestock. But now you have to go and buy."

  • how his diet has changed

"I started having tea in 1916."

  • what he recommends eating for good health

"If you start with milk exclusive, or cream made from milk, just that. That is it. Up to 7 years [of age]. Children were breastfed up to 5 years. Everything [we ate] was from the cow: milk, blood."

  • about his family

"I have more than 17 children. And 5 grandchildren. They are good, good health. I have three brothers. They are still alive. I have one sister. She is still alive."

  • about wealth, cattle and goats

"My sons have taken them."

Goats (but these are not the ones taken from Sankau!)
Goats (but these are not the ones taken from Sankau!)
  • final thoughts

"I am also thankful to God that I have had that opportunity to do good while I have been in this world. I am alive because of God. God formed me in the womb."

There you have it! To me, it's crystal clear that Sankau's traditional diet has contributed to his good health and longevity. And as I see it, the secrets to a healthy life from this centenarian include eating plenty of raw milk (and cream), taking opportunities to do good, and giving thanks to God. What do you see?

***

Hilda Labrada Gore is a podcast professional who helps holistic health practitioners launch their own shows! She is the host and producer of the Wise Traditions podcast, sponsored by the Weston A. Price Foundation for wise traditions in food, farming, and the healing arts. She is an integrative nutrition health coach, a fitness professional, and the DC Metro Regional Director for Body & Soul Fitness. She lives in D.C. with her husband, Mitch, their children, and their cat and dog.

How to get out of your own way & launch your podcast

How to get out of your own way & launch your podcast

When we are about to launch our show for the very first time, we become afraid, hesitant, concerned about perceived and real dangers. “Will I get it right?” “Will people listen?” “What if it sucks?” “What if I screw up?”

Keep It Simple, Sunshine!

"Simplicity is gourmet." This is a statement that my dear friend Hilary Boynton said one day that I simply can't get out of my head. Hilary is the author of the "Heal your gut" cookbook and she has a penchant for meeting people, especially folks she calls our "elders," to pick their brains and learn from their wisdom, and, particularly, their culinary wisdom. One day, she connected with a French woman who was over 90 years old and the words "simplicity is gourmet" were uttered. They resonated with Hilary and they resonate with me. 

Far too often we over-think things. We get caught up in the weeds of life. We stretch ourselves beyond our limits. We are exhausted trying to meet the demands of life, and the demands of those around us. How can we keep our sanity amidst the push and pull of the daily grind?

I suggest that the answer may lie in the wise words of the nonagenarian. And, specifically, in the first word of her coined phrase: "Simplicity."

To be honest, I went 'round and 'round as I tried to figure out what to post today. I was definitely over-thinking it and my anxiety rose as the new month commenced and I started to feel pressure. What would I tell my friends about health and wellness? I started to get tied up in knots, which was leading to some unhappiness and stress. But then I remembered the old moniker: K.I.S.S. Keep it simple, Sunshine! (Okay, I've taken some liberties with the last word of the phrase, but I find it's friendlier that way!)

A light bulb went off as a I realized that the best tips are the ones that are simply bringing me joy and helping me manage my oh-so-crazy life. And I'm going to use the acronym to help you (and me) keep it all straight.

Keep it simple - (See what I did there?) Just focus on food, real food, I mean. There are so many trends out there for getting that perfect "beach body." Fuggedaboutit! If you have a body you can get on a beach. Scales are for fish...and no body's perfect, literally! Simply stay the course by focusing on eating food that nourishes and not just filling up with whatever junk food (there's a reason they call it that) that is handy or appealing in the moment. And if you "slip up," don't beat yourself up. That only adds insult to injury, just keep pressing on. Go to farmers markets, Trader Joe's; connect with friends who care about where their food comes from. Fuel your body to the best of your ability (financially and otherwise) and let the other stuff go. A singular focus can help you achieve your health goals. 

Initiate - Consider well how you choose to start your day. Do you immediately get on your phone? Read the paper? Check emails? Maybe you are roused by a little one who wet the bed. Or the alarm reminds you that you have an early meeting. Not everything is under your control, but to the extent it is possible, make an effort to get some quiet, meditative time without the newspaper, without my computer. I take space, I make space to breathe. The world can wait. So let it do so. 

Sleep - Scientists are finding more and more that sleep plays a critical role in our wellness. It's the time our brains "take out the trash" of all of the stressors and pressures of the day! So do not shortchange yourself on this piece. (I am talking to myself, too! This has often been a weak spot for me.) If you have a lot of work to do, rather than working on it late at night, stop at a decent hour and pick it back up again in the morning. It will still be there, and you can face it with a fresh(er) perspective, when you'll be more focused and less likely to make mistakes, too! (For more on this, check out one of my early podcast episodes with Sandra Van Gilder, "The myths and truths of sleep and exercise.")

Sunshine - I am convinced of the benefits of early morning light. It helps set the tone for the day and gets your circadian rhythm in proper sync. So I combine "Initiate" and "Sunshine." That is, I get outside as early as possible to walk my dog. I don't take my phone, so that my mind and heart can be free to sing, pray, absorb what's going on around me, and just be present. 

 Me and Summer, post-walk this morning. (And me w/o makeup too---another way to keep life simple!)

Me and Summer, post-walk this morning. (And me w/o makeup too---another way to keep life simple!)

So, that's it! In an effort to K.I.S.S. this post, I am stopping right here. I believe if we apply these simple hacks to our lives, we'll have a happy, healthy summer (and autumn, winter, and spring, too)! 

***

Hilda Labrada Gore is a podcast professional who helps holistic health practitioners launch their own shows! She is also the host and producer of the Wise Traditions podcast, sponsored by the Weston A. Price Foundation for wise traditions in food, farming, and the healing arts. She is an integrative nutrition health coach, a fitness professional, and the DC Metro Regional Director for Body & Soul Fitness. She lives in D.C. with her husband, Mitch, their children, and their cat and dog.

The benefits of the "outside diet"

The benefits of the "outside diet"

This is not a post so much about disconnecting from devices (though that will help), but rather one about connecting with our surroundings. Think of this as a "lean in" post about nature.

We MUST stop burying our children!

We MUST stop burying our children!

I've observed this heartbreaking trend, as well. In the past six months, four of my friends have lost boys to suicide. They were all in their twenties and struggling with depression. One of the moms likened it to swimming in the ocean. She said her son would be doing fine, until the undertow would catch him and drag him under.

How to navigate food (and life) transitions

How to navigate food (and life) transitions

“How do you get your family to accept a real food diet when all they want are chicken nuggets?” “My kid is a picky eater. He eats cereal three times a day. What do I do?” “I want to eat ‘healthy’ but I crave a sugary snack every afternoon (and evening, if I’m honest)!”

The struggle is real! You are now convinced of the basics: that eating a healthy diet means eating more real, whole foods, and less of the food-like processed stuff that comes in packages! Bravo! But how do you go from the head to the heart (or should I say to the mouth)? 

When it comes to health, go with your gut!

When it comes to health, go with your gut!

These random symptoms—rashes, hives, reactions, pain—are the body’s way of waving a red flag at us. “Something’s wrong! Pay attention! HELP!”

How to cure a holiday hangover (and why resolutions have nothing to do with it)

How to cure a holiday hangover (and why resolutions have nothing to do with it)

The holidays can leave us like our bank accounts: depleted. So it's not the time to set ourselves up for failure with lots of unachievable resolutions. Here is my suggestion for what to do instead.

How to have a "healthy-ish" holiday season

How to have a "healthy-ish" holiday season

So, no promises today. No “three tips for a tinsel-perfect holiday.” Nope. Instead, I am offering you some ideas on how to have a healthy-ish holiday season, with reasonable, actionable strategies for getting through December and early January intact, happy and healthy…for the most part.

A taste of Peru: the tension between old and new

A taste of Peru: the tension between old and new

Supermarkets selling sodas and processed foods are blocks away from the open-air markets with “mamitas” selling the produce from their gardens by the roadside. Monsanto and Bayer have reached the Sacred Valley and are persuading farmers to replace their natural varied corn crops with their one variety of corn (from genetically-modified seeds). Mining is generating incomes for small towns, but simultaneously polluting their drinking and irrigation water. Villagers are fighting back, but their voices aren’t always heard. As you can see, there are multiple threats to the health of the people and the land of Peru. 

Peru...at present

Peru...at present

In Quechua, there is no past. There is no future either. This concept took a while to sink in for me, but once it did, it gave me a better idea of how we should live...today.

Spark Notes for "Improving your health 101"

Spark Notes for "Improving your health 101"

Jodi Ledley had debilitating migraines. Once she learned to avoid MSG (and other excitotoxins like it), she found herself on the path to healing. For years, she's eaten only at home. There, she has been able to control the quality of the food and avoid the additives that caused the neurological disruption that triggered her migraines. 

Sticky tip: Chipotle is one of the few fast/casual places Jodi found where you can enjoy a meal that is MSG- and GMO-free! (By the way, I don’t have stock in that company, so I do not benefit from your eating there! But Jodi mentioned it, so I thought I'd pass the tip along.)

The "x" factors that impact your health

The "x" factors that impact your health

For vibrant health, we must attend to our spirit/mind/emotions—what I call the “x” factors that impact our wellbeing.  To nourish this part of us, we need to do things that fill us, lift us up, bring contentment or make us feel vibrant and alive.

What's cooking in Zimbabwe?

I just returned from two wild and wonderful weeks in Zimbabwe. I was able to connect with wildlife, work out with friends, and get a glimpse of life on the amazing continent of Africa. Part of the trip was “business” (this is in quotes because Body & Soul fitness is my passion and leading exercise routines and speaking can hardly be considered work); the other part was pleasure—visiting game parks and animal sanctuaries.

As a health coach and Wise Traditions podcaster, I was naturally very curious about the dietary habits of the people of Zimbabwe. My time was spent primarily in Harare and its immediate environs, so I wasn’t able to look into all of the local diets and customs. However, I can tell you what I noticed while staying with friends and sharing meals together. They showed me, more than told me, about their food habits and what I witnessed warmed my heart.

-       Vegetable gardens

-       Backdoor chickens (yes, they call them “backdoor” not “backyard” chickens)

-       Eggs from said chickens for breakfast (w/ bacon as a side) or hard-boiled eggs for lunch

-       Hearty soups made with chicken stock and vegetables for dinner

-       Plentiful vegetables (from their own gardens) such as zucchini, squash, spinach

-       Home-brewed kombucha and fermented drinks (like kefir) available at farmers markets

-       Said-same farmers markets selling fresh organic (or at least local) foods several days a week all around Harare

It was clear that many Zimbabweans were intimately linked to the land. I asked my friends about it and they explained that in 2008 the country hit a devastating low point. The economy tanked. It was at that time that people of every socio-economic class began turning to their own devices for sustenance. They could not rely on produce being kept in stock at their local shops, since imports were down and farms were being overtaken by the government. They had to rely on themselves. This was the year many middle-class and upper middle-class families began planting vegetable gardens and keeping backdoor chickens.

Today, Zimbabwe is still struggling, going through yet another economic crisis. Their currency had devalued so much, every purchase required millions of Zim dollars. The government has issued bond notes recently to stabilize the situation, but cash of any kind is still in short supply. People must wait in long lines in the hopes of getting bond notes or American currency.

Despite the chaos, or maybe because of it, I saw wise traditions at play at virtually every turn. From the most modest residents selling produce by the side of the road, to the more privileged buying it or simply growing their own, it is clear that real food plays an important role in Zimbabwe. “Homemade” and “farm-fresh” are not buzzwords but more of a way of life here.

This is not to say that there are no big food corporations promoting their own products, threatening the real food movement. Fizzy drinks (sodas) are promoted all over the landscape. Billboards tout margarine and vegetable oils as “heart healthy.” Fast food restaurants are marketed as modern and hip.

And yet, the sight of those backdoor chickens, clucking and pecking in every home I visited, gave me hope that wise traditions may still win the day in Zim. Because real food is what's cooking in Zim today!

***

Hilda Labrada Gore is the producer and host of the Wise Traditions podcast found on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play Music, iHeart Radio, tunein, YouTube and at westonaprice.org. She is the DC metro regional director for Body & Soul Fitness and a certified integrative nutrition health coach. She lives in DC with her husband and children, their cat, Mia, and their dog, Summer.

 

 

 

Why do normal people question vaccines?

Children ask questions about everything under the sun. Reporters ask questions to get their story. Scientists ask questions to understand a matter. I am a normal person who is  kicking off this post with a couple of questions. Why is there a taboo around questioning vaccines? Why can’t normal people question them without being labeled “wackos” or “anti-vaxxers?” I suggest that all of us should feel free to question vaccines, and here’s why.

  • If we care about the food we ingest, we should care about everything we put into our bodies.
  • If we want to know the list of ingredients in the food we are eating, we should want to know what ingredients are in a vaccination.
  • If we are skeptical of conventional health care, we should question the motives of pharmaceutical companies that are lobbying for mandatory vaccinations for children and adults, nationwide.
  • If we believe in food freedom (that we should be allowed to eat what we want to eat), we should also embrace health freedom (that we have the right to accept or reject any medical procedure).

As a young mom, I remember wondering if I should follow the vaccine schedule for my children. I had no logical reason to question vaccinations at all, really, because I didn’t know much about vaccine side effects or ingredients or anything. There was just a little question in the back of my mind, a kind of check in my gut about them. I suppose I was hesitant about them because of the fact that I had always been a girl with a natural bent. I figured my body could handle itself, without too much interference. I preferred to let a fever run its course. I would avoid over-the-counter remedies for a mild cold or aches and pains. I chose completely natural childbirth for each of my babies (no pain-killing drugs, no medical interventions).

So while I wasn’t super informed about vaccinations, I wondered about the benefit/risk ratio. But I didn’t wonder for long. I went ahead and had my children all vaccinated on time because I knew that in Washington DC, in order to attend public school, they had to have all of the vaccinations, according to the CDC schedule.

I didn’t think much more about it for some time. My inclination to keep things natural, health-wise, eventually led me to become a member, and then a chapter leader for the Weston A. Price Foundation (WAPF). I liked their natural bent! They espouse Hippocrates' motto "Let food be thy medicine and let medicine be thy food."

However, when I came across something in the WAPF literature about vaccinations, I scratched my head about it, because I thought that WAPF was a nutrition group, focused on food, farming, and the healing arts. A stance on vaccinations (and an individual’s right to reject them) seemed an unnecessarily polarizing position to take. Why would WAPF go out on a limb when they could safely advocate for wholesome food and sustainable farming practices, without rocking the status quo?

IMG_1987
IMG_1987

Over time, the answer started to dawn on me. WAPF is a group that’s willing to ask questions about conventional health protocol. Of course their willingness to ask about food sources, food quality, and the like would translate to other things we put into our bodies. It struck me that it is normal, and even healthy, to ask questions to safeguard my health and the health of my family. So I began to dig around and ask a few questions, myself.

  • Why are premature babies given the same dose of vaccines as full-term babies? (Shouldn’t the dosage be adjusted for weight?)
  • What ingredients are in the vaccines and are any toxic or apt to cause adverse reactions?
  • Why do babies get a hepB vaccine the day they are born (when it is a vaccine intended to prevent a disease that is sexually communicated)?
  • Is there room for a conversation about spacing out the heavy vaccination schedule that requires up to 24 doses before a child reaches 5 years of age?
  • Why is it so difficult to get a medical or religious exemption in most states?
  • Why are children denied a public education when unvaccinated, if education is a constitutional right?
  • If vaccines are safe and effective, why was the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act established in 1986, setting up a vaccine injury compensation program (that to date has doled out over 3..8 billion dollars to families of vaccine-injured children and adults)?
  • Why has the CDC not done a controlled study, comparing the health of vaccinated and unvaccinated children?
  • Why was the CDC accused of covering up study results that indicated a link between vaccinations and autism among African-American boys?
  • If vaccines do not cause autism, as the CDC claims, where are the studies that disprove the link?
  • And a related question: if vaccines don’t cause autism, why do so many parents of autistic children insist that they do?
  • What does the evidence around us suggest?
  • What links are there between vaccinations and other injuries and illnesses?
  • Why are vaccines pushed at every turn (in grocery stores, corner drug stores, etc.)? And who stands to gain from this push?

Do you have questions of your own? Great! That means you're normal. Keep digging until you find answers that satisfy your curiosity. And check out these podcast episodes to learn something beyond what the mainstream media reports:

#16 Vaccines: what’s all the fuss about? (part 1) -  w/ producer Leslie Manookian of “The Greater Good”

#17 Vaccines: what's all the fuss about? (part 2) 

#54 Vaxxed: Producer's commentary - w/ Del Bigtree of “Vaxxed,” the movie that focuses on the CDC whistleblower

#64 The vaccine industry & your rights - w/ attorney Alan Phillips

#72 Fighting for health freedom – a group of people in West Virginia are fighting for the right to vaccine exemptions

me-and-apple-2
me-and-apple-2

*** Hilda Labrada Gore is the producer and host of the Wise Traditions podcast found on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play Music, iHeart Radio, tunein, YouTube and at westonaprice.org. She lives in DC with her husband and children, their cat, Mia, and their dog, Summer.